Prostate and bladder: prostatic hyperplasia with subsequent hypertrophy of the muscle in the bladder wall

Normally, the prostate gland has an outer rim (peripheral zone), central zone, and transitional zone, the latter surrounding the prostatic urethra. The gland is under the control of dihydrotestosterone (DHT, recall that DHT is normally responsible for development of the prostate in the fetus), hence an increase in DHT leads to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH primarily occurs in the transitional zone around the urethra. Note how the cut surface of the prostate gland bulges (see arrow). Nodular areas are noted throughout the gland and represent areas of hyperplasia. The surrounding hyperplastic tissue compresses the prostatic urethra in the center of the gland. Symptoms of BPH relate to urethral obstruction. Symptoms include delayed initiation of the urinary stream, narrow urinary stream, increased frequency of urination (patient often wakes up at night to urinate), dribbling at the end of urination, and the possibility of complete obstruction to urine flow. Complete obstruction of urinary flow causes a back up of urine into the bladder. This backup of urine dilates the bladder and causes hypertrophy of the smooth muscles in the bladder wall, since they are contracting against increased resistance. Furthermore, the urine backs up into the ureters (dilated) and renal pelvises causing dilatation. This is called hydronephrosis.

Prostate and bladder: prostatic hyperplasia with subsequent hypertrophy of the muscle in the bladder wall

Normally, the prostate gland has an outer rim (peripheral zone), central zone, and transitional zone, the latter surrounding the prostatic urethra. The gland is under the control of dihydrotestosterone (DHT, recall that DHT is normally responsible for development of the prostate in the fetus), hence an increase in DHT leads to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH primarily occurs in the transitional zone around the urethra. Note how the cut surface of the prostate gland bulges (see arrow). Nodular areas are noted throughout the gland and represent areas of hyperplasia. The surrounding hyperplastic tissue compresses the prostatic urethra in the center of the gland. Symptoms of BPH relate to urethral obstruction. Symptoms include delayed initiation of the urinary stream, narrow urinary stream, increased frequency of urination (patient often wakes up at night to urinate), dribbling at the end of urination, and the possibility of complete obstruction to urine flow. Complete obstruction of urinary flow causes a back up of urine into the bladder. This backup of urine dilates the bladder and causes hypertrophy of the smooth muscles in the bladder wall, since they are contracting against increased resistance. Furthermore, the urine backs up into the ureters (dilated) and renal pelvises causing dilatation. This is called hydronephrosis.

Prostate and bladder: prostatic hyperplasia with subsequent hypertrophy of the muscle in the bladder wall

Normally, the prostate gland has an outer rim (peripheral zone), central zone, and transitional zone, the latter surrounding the prostatic urethra. The gland is under the control of dihydrotestosterone (DHT, recall that DHT is normally responsible for development of the prostate in the fetus), hence an increase in DHT leads to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH primarily occurs in the transitional zone around the urethra. Note how the cut surface of the prostate gland bulges (see arrow). Nodular areas are noted throughout the gland and represent areas of hyperplasia. The surrounding hyperplastic tissue compresses the prostatic urethra in the center of the gland. Symptoms of BPH relate to urethral obstruction. Symptoms include delayed initiation of the urinary stream, narrow urinary stream, increased frequency of urination (patient often wakes up at night to urinate), dribbling at the end of urination, and the possibility of complete obstruction to urine flow. Complete obstruction of urinary flow causes a back up of urine into the bladder. This backup of urine dilates the bladder and causes hypertrophy of the smooth muscles in the bladder wall, since they are contracting against increased resistance. Furthermore, the urine backs up into the ureters (dilated) and renal pelvises causing dilatation. This is called hydronephrosis.

Prostate and bladder: prostatic hyperplasia with subsequent hypertrophy of the muscle in the bladder wall

Normally, the prostate gland has an outer rim (peripheral zone), central zone, and transitional zone, the latter surrounding the prostatic urethra. The gland is under the control of dihydrotestosterone (DHT, recall that DHT is normally responsible for development of the prostate in the fetus), hence an increase in DHT leads to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH primarily occurs in the transitional zone around the urethra. Note how the cut surface of the prostate gland bulges (see arrow). Nodular areas are noted throughout the gland and represent areas of hyperplasia. The surrounding hyperplastic tissue compresses the prostatic urethra in the center of the gland. Symptoms of BPH relate to urethral obstruction. Symptoms include delayed initiation of the urinary stream, narrow urinary stream, increased frequency of urination (patient often wakes up at night to urinate), dribbling at the end of urination, and the possibility of complete obstruction to urine flow. Complete obstruction of urinary flow causes a back up of urine into the bladder. This backup of urine dilates the bladder and causes hypertrophy of the smooth muscles in the bladder wall, since they are contracting against increased resistance. Furthermore, the urine backs up into the ureters (dilated) and renal pelvises causing dilatation. This is called hydronephrosis.

Posted 2 years ago & Filed under cellularinjury, usmle, pathology, slides, medicine, goljan,

About: